Thursday, January 1, 2015

Vasilopita

Today, January 1st, is the feast of St. Basil the Great. Traditionally a cake called Vasilopita ([St.] Basil Pie) is baked and eaten today. We've never actually made it, but this year I decided we'd waited long enough. Duchess made it herself after we reviewed the recipe and made a few slight modifications. I would like to do a more elaborate one next year, but this was good for a first time.






She forgot to insert a coin before baking, but Mama came to the rescue and (unbeknownst to the children) inserted several nickles through the bottom of the cake before inverting it on a plate. :)


And here's the recipe we used:


14 comments:

  1. It looks delicious! I plan to make one in about 13 days ;) it will my first time, also.

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    1. I think there are several of us making this for the first time! I look forward to seeing how yours turns out (fantastic, I'm sure)!

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  2. Ah, several nickels! That's the right idea!

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    1. I KNOW the tradition is to insert ONE coin, but I realized that frankly, I would rather have a happier household and everyone get a coin.

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    2. good call! would you mind sharing the recipe? your's looks great!!!!

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    3. Sure! I'll put it up sometime this evening. :)

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  3. A dear lady at our parish puts in enough coins for all the kids of the church into a huge 10x13 pan!

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  4. Happy new year to you and your family!

    Bear in mind that you can bake any kind of pie and call it vasilopita - in some regions in Greece vasilopita is a meatpie!
    Here's to many more to be cut in your household:)

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  5. Yeah, technically it is supposed to be some kind of bread, because it is based on a miracle of St Basil. Huge taxes had to be paid to the governor (or an external enemy, I 'm not sure) so people gathered all their jewellery and money and trusted it to St. Basil. He, however, managed to change the mind of the governor, and the way he thought of to return the treasures to their true owners was to have breads/cakes baked, each with some of the gathered gold inside, and give them out to the people. Miraculously, everyone got what they had offered. This is why traditionally before the pie is blessed (incense, lamp and icons around) and cut, each member of the family lays a piece of their jewellery on it. Some regions bake cakes, others sweet yeasted breads. But in cattle-growing regions people had to use what they produced so they came up with meatpies or cheesepies (I' m not sure if they lay jewellery on it, though!).
    Yours, however, is the first basilbundt I have seen:D Sounds very southern so it's most appropriate!

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    1. This vasilopita has a hole in it! LOL :)

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